How does a 2017 Ford Fusion compare to its competition in Safety Near Flowery Branch, GA?


 
  • Greene Ford Journal
  • Jul 16th 2017 - 127 days ago
  • Flowery Branch, GA
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Compared To Chrysler 200 2016



The rear seatbelts optional on the Fusion inflate when a collision is detected, helping to spread crash forces over a much larger area of the body and limiting head and neck movement. This can help prevent spinal and internal injuries. The 200 doesn’t offer inflatable seatbelts.

The Fusion (except S)’s optional driver alert monitor detects an inattentive driver then sounds a warning and suggests a break. According to the NHTSA, drivers who fall asleep cause about 100,000 crashes and 1500 deaths a year. The 200 doesn’t offer a driver alert monitor.

Both the Fusion and the 200 have standard driver and passenger frontal airbags, front side-impact airbags, driver and front passenger knee airbags, side-impact head airbags, front seatbelt pretensioners, front wheel drive, height adjustable front shoulder belts, plastic fuel tanks, four-wheel antilock brakes, traction control, electronic stability systems to prevent skidding, daytime running lights, available crash mitigating brakes, lane departure warning systems, blind spot warning systems, front and rear parking sensors and rear cross-path warning.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration does 35 MPH front crash tests on new vehicles. In this test, results indicate that the Ford Fusion is safer than the Chrysler 200:

Fusion

200

Driver

STARS

5 Stars

5 Stars

HIC

125

134

Neck Injury Risk

28%

29%

Neck Stress

200 lbs.

274 lbs.

Leg Forces (l/r)

167/333 lbs.

312/391 lbs.

New test not comparable to pre-2011 test results. More stars = Better. Lower test results = Better.




Compared To Chevrolet Impala 2017



The rear seatbelts optional on the Fusion inflate when a collision is detected, helping to spread crash forces over a much larger area of the body and limiting head and neck movement. This can help prevent spinal and internal injuries. The Impala doesn’t offer inflatable seatbelts.

The Fusion offers all-wheel drive to maximize traction under poor conditions, especially in ice and snow. The Impala doesn’t offer all-wheel drive.

The Fusion (except S) offers optional Reverse Sensing System to help warn the driver about vehicles, pedestrians or other obstacles behind or, optionally, in front of the vehicle. The Impala doesn’t offer a front parking aid.

The Fusion (except S)’s optional driver alert monitor detects an inattentive driver then sounds a warning and suggests a break. According to the NHTSA, drivers who fall asleep cause about 100,000 crashes and 1500 deaths a year. The Impala doesn’t offer a driver alert monitor.

Both the Fusion and the Impala have standard driver and passenger frontal airbags, front side-impact airbags, driver and front passenger knee airbags, side-impact head airbags, front seatbelt pretensioners, front-wheel drive, height-adjustable front shoulder belts, plastic fuel tanks, four-wheel antilock brakes, traction control, electronic stability systems to prevent skidding, daytime running lights, available crash mitigating brakes, lane departure warning systems, blind spot warning systems and rear cross-path warning.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration does 35 MPH front crash tests on new vehicles. In this test, results indicate that the Ford Fusion is safer than the Chevrolet Impala:

 

Fusion

Impala

 

Driver

STARS

5 Stars

5 Stars

HIC

125

229

Neck Compression

24 lbs.

30 lbs.

New test not comparable to pre-2011 test results. More stars = Better. Lower test results = Better.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration does side impact tests on new vehicles. In this test, which crashes the vehicle into a flat barrier at 38.5 MPH and into a post at 20 MPH, results indicate that the Ford Fusion is safer than the Chevrolet Impala:

 

Fusion

Impala

 

Front Seat

STARS

5 Stars

4 Stars

HIC

74

75

Chest Movement

1.3 inches

1.3 inches

Hip Force

277 lbs.

332 lbs.

 

Rear Seat

STARS

5 Stars

5 Stars

Hip Force

790 lbs.

855 lbs.

 

Into Pole

STARS

5 Stars

5 Stars

HIC

268

315

New test not comparable to pre-2011 test results. More stars = Better. Lower test results = Better.

For its top level performance in all IIHS frontal, side, rear impact and roof-crush tests, and with its optional front crash prevention system, the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety grants the Fusion the rating of “Top Pick” for 2017, a rating granted to only 103 vehicles tested by the IIHS. The Impala has not been fully tested, yet.




Compared To Hyundai Sonata 2016



The rear seatbelts optional on the Fusion inflate when a collision is detected, helping to spread crash forces over a much larger area of the body and limiting head and neck movement. This can help prevent spinal and internal injuries. The Sonata doesn’t offer inflatable seatbelts.

The Fusion offers all-wheel drive to maximize traction under poor conditions, especially in ice and snow. The Sonata doesn’t offer all-wheel drive.

The Fusion (except S) offers optional Reverse Sensing System to help warn the driver about vehicles, pedestrians or other obstacles behind or, optionally, in front of the vehicle. The Sonata doesn’t offer a front parking aid.

The Fusion (except S)’s optional driver alert monitor detects an inattentive driver then sounds a warning and suggests a break. According to the NHTSA, drivers who fall asleep cause about 100,000 crashes and 1500 deaths a year. The Sonata doesn’t offer a driver alert monitor.

Compared to metal, the Fusion’s plastic fuel tank can withstand harder, more intrusive impacts without leaking; this decreases the possibility of fire. The Hyundai Sonata has a metal gas tank.

Both the Fusion and the Sonata have standard driver and passenger frontal airbags, front side-impact airbags, driver knee airbags, side-impact head airbags, front seatbelt pretensioners, front wheel drive, height adjustable front shoulder belts, four-wheel antilock brakes, traction control, electronic stability systems to prevent skidding, daytime running lights, rearview cameras, available crash mitigating brakes, lane departure warning systems, blind spot warning systems and rear cross-path warning.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration does 35 MPH front crash tests on new vehicles. In this test, results indicate that the Ford Fusion is safer than the Hyundai Sonata:

Fusion

Sonata

Driver

STARS

5 Stars

5 Stars

HIC

125

245

Neck Compression

24 lbs.

49 lbs.

Leg Forces (l/r)

167/333 lbs.

198/433 lbs.

New test not comparable to pre-2011 test results. More stars = Better. Lower test results = Better.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration does side impact tests on new vehicles. In this test, which crashes the vehicle into a flat barrier at 38.5 MPH and into a post at 20 MPH, results indicate that the Ford Fusion is safer than the Hyundai Sonata:

Fusion

Sonata

Rear Seat

STARS

5 Stars

5 Stars

HIC

225

354

Spine Acceleration

61 G’s

74 G’s

Into Pole

STARS

5 Stars

5 Stars

Hip Force

597 lbs.

773 lbs.

New test not comparable to pre-2011 test results. More stars = Better. Lower test results = Better.




Compared To Buick LaCrosse 2017



The rear seatbelts optional on the Fusion inflate when a collision is detected, helping to spread crash forces over a much larger area of the body and limiting head and neck movement. This can help prevent spinal and internal injuries. The LaCrosse doesn’t offer inflatable seatbelts.

The Fusion (except S)’s optional driver alert monitor detects an inattentive driver then sounds a warning and suggests a break. According to the NHTSA, drivers who fall asleep cause about 100,000 crashes and 1500 deaths a year. The LaCrosse doesn’t offer a driver alert monitor.

Both the Fusion and the LaCrosse have standard driver and passenger frontal airbags, front side-impact airbags, driver and front passenger knee airbags, side-impact head airbags, front seatbelt pretensioners, front wheel drive, height adjustable front shoulder belts, four-wheel antilock brakes, traction control, electronic stability systems to prevent skidding, daytime running lights, rearview cameras, available crash mitigating brakes, lane departure warning systems, blind spot warning systems, front and rear parking sensors and rear cross-path warning.




Compared To Kia Optima 2016



The rear seatbelts optional on the Fusion inflate when a collision is detected, helping to spread crash forces over a much larger area of the body and limiting head and neck movement. This can help prevent spinal and internal injuries. The Optima doesn’t offer inflatable seatbelts.

The Fusion offers all-wheel drive to maximize traction under poor conditions, especially in ice and snow. The Optima doesn’t offer all-wheel drive.

The Fusion (except S)’s optional driver alert monitor detects an inattentive driver then sounds a warning and suggests a break. According to the NHTSA, drivers who fall asleep cause about 100,000 crashes and 1500 deaths a year. The Optima doesn’t offer a driver alert monitor.

The Fusion has standard SYNC®, which uses a global positioning satellite (GPS) receiver and a cellular system to get turn-by-turn driving directions or send emergency personnel to the scene if any airbags deploy. The Optima doesn’t offer a GPS response system, only a navigation computer with no live response for emergencies, so if you’re involved in an accident and you’re incapacitated help may not come as quickly.

Both the Fusion and the Optima have standard driver and passenger frontal airbags, front side-impact airbags, driver knee airbags, side-impact head airbags, front seatbelt pretensioners, front-wheel drive, height-adjustable front shoulder belts, plastic fuel tanks, four-wheel antilock brakes, traction control, electronic stability systems to prevent skidding, rearview cameras, available crash mitigating brakes, lane departure warning systems, blind spot warning systems, front and rear parking sensors and rear cross-path warning.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration does 35 MPH front crash tests on new vehicles. In this test, results indicate that the Ford Fusion is safer than the Kia Optima:

 

Fusion

Optima

 

Driver

STARS

5 Stars

5 Stars

HIC

125

185

Neck Stress

200 lbs.

218 lbs.

Neck Compression

24 lbs.

55 lbs.

New test not comparable to pre-2011 test results. More stars = Better. Lower test results = Better.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration does side impact tests on new vehicles. In this test, which crashes the vehicle into a flat barrier at 38.5 MPH, results indicate that the Ford Fusion is safer than the Kia Optima:

 

Fusion

Optima

 

Front Seat

STARS

5 Stars

5 Stars

HIC

74

111

Hip Force

277 lbs.

306 lbs.

 

Rear Seat

STARS

5 Stars

5 Stars

HIC

225

319

Spine Acceleration

61 G’s

66 G’s

Hip Force

790 lbs.

933 lbs.

New test not comparable to pre-2011 test results. More stars = Better. Lower test results = Better.




Compared To Chevrolet Malibu Limited 2016



The rear seatbelts optional on the Fusion inflate when a collision is detected, helping to spread crash forces over a much larger area of the body and limiting head and neck movement. This can help prevent spinal and internal injuries. The Malibu Limited doesn’t offer inflatable seatbelts.

The Fusion (except S) offers optional Active Braking, which use forward mounted sensors to warn the driver of a possible collision ahead. If the driver doesn’t react and the system determines a collision is imminent, it automatically applies the brakes at full-force in order to reduce the force of the crash or avoid it altogether. The Malibu Limited offers an available collision warning system without the automated brake feature that would prevent or reduce the collision if the driver fails to react.

The Fusion offers all-wheel drive to maximize traction under poor conditions, especially in ice and snow. The Malibu Limited doesn’t offer all-wheel drive.

The Fusion (except S) offers optional Reverse Sensing System to help warn the driver about vehicles, pedestrians or other obstacles behind or, optionally, in front of the vehicle. The Malibu Limited doesn’t offer a front parking aid.

The Fusion (except S)’s optional driver alert monitor detects an inattentive driver then sounds a warning and suggests a break. According to the NHTSA, drivers who fall asleep cause about 100,000 crashes and 1500 deaths a year. The Malibu Limited doesn’t offer a driver alert monitor.

Both the Fusion and the Malibu Limited have standard driver and passenger frontal airbags, front side-impact airbags, driver and front passenger knee airbags, side-impact head airbags, front seatbelt pretensioners, front-wheel drive, height-adjustable front shoulder belts, four-wheel antilock brakes, traction control, electronic stability systems to prevent skidding, daytime running lights, available lane departure warning systems, blind spot warning systems and rear cross-path warning.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration does 35 MPH front crash tests on new vehicles. In this test, results indicate that the Ford Fusion is safer than the Chevrolet Malibu Limited:

 

Fusion

Malibu Limited

 

Driver

STARS

5 Stars

5 Stars

HIC

125

134

Neck Injury Risk

28%

29%

Neck Stress

200 lbs.

206 lbs.

Neck Compression

24 lbs.

54 lbs.

New test not comparable to pre-2011 test results. More stars = Better. Lower test results = Better.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration does side impact tests on new vehicles. In this test, which crashes the vehicle into a flat barrier at 38.5 MPH and into a post at 20 MPH, results indicate that the Ford Fusion is safer than the Chevrolet Malibu Limited:

 

Fusion

Malibu Limited

 

Front Seat

STARS

5 Stars

5 Stars

HIC

74

155

Hip Force

277 lbs.

307 lbs.

 

Rear Seat

STARS

5 Stars

5 Stars

Hip Force

790 lbs.

852 lbs.

 

Into Pole

STARS

5 Stars

5 Stars

HIC

268

408

New test not comparable to pre-2011 test results. More stars = Better. Lower test results = Better.

For its top level performance in all IIHS frontal, side, rear impact and roof-crush tests, and with its optional front crash prevention system, the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety grants the Fusion the rating of “Top Pick” for 2017, a rating granted to only 103 vehicles tested by the IIHS. The Malibu Limited was last qualified as a “Top Pick” in 2016.

The Ford Fusion has a better fatality history. The Fusion was involved in fatal accidents at a rate 9% lower per vehicle registered than the Malibu Limited, according to the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety.




Compared To Alfa Romeo Giulia 2017



For enhanced safety, the front seat shoulder belts of the Ford Fusion are height-adjustable to accommodate a wide variety of driver and passenger heights. A better fit can prevent injuries and the increased comfort also encourages passengers to buckle up. The Alfa Romeo Giulia doesn’t offer height-adjustable seat belts.

The rear seatbelts optional on the Fusion inflate when a collision is detected, helping to spread crash forces over a much larger area of the body and limiting head and neck movement. This can help prevent spinal and internal injuries. The Giulia doesn’t offer inflatable seatbelts.

The Fusion (except S)’s optional driver alert monitor detects an inattentive driver then sounds a warning and suggests a break. According to the NHTSA, drivers who fall asleep cause about 100,000 crashes and 1500 deaths a year. The Giulia doesn’t offer a driver alert monitor.

Both the Fusion and the Giulia have standard driver and passenger frontal airbags, front side-impact airbags, driver and front passenger knee airbags, side-impact head airbags, front seatbelt pretensioners, four-wheel antilock brakes, traction control, electronic stability systems to prevent skidding, daytime running lights, rearview cameras, available crash mitigating brakes, lane departure warning systems, blind spot warning systems, front and rear parking sensors and rear cross-path warning.

For its top level performance in all IIHS frontal, side, rear impact and roof-crush tests, and with its optional front crash prevention system, the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety grants the Fusion the rating of “Top Pick” for 2017, a rating granted to only 112 vehicles tested by the IIHS. The Giulia has not been tested, yet.




Compared To Nissan Altima Sedan 2017



The rear seatbelts optional on the Fusion inflate when a collision is detected, helping to spread crash forces over a much larger area of the body and limiting head and neck movement. This can help prevent spinal and internal injuries. The Altima Sedan doesn’t offer inflatable seatbelts.

The Fusion offers all-wheel drive to maximize traction under poor conditions, especially in ice and snow. The Altima Sedan doesn’t offer all-wheel drive.

The Fusion (except S)’s optional driver alert monitor detects an inattentive driver then sounds a warning and suggests a break. According to the NHTSA, drivers who fall asleep cause about 100,000 crashes and 1500 deaths a year. The Altima Sedan doesn’t offer a driver alert monitor.

The Fusion has standard SYNC®, which uses a global positioning satellite (GPS) receiver and a cellular system to get turn-by-turn driving directions or send emergency personnel to the scene if any airbags deploy. The Altima Sedan doesn’t offer a GPS response system, only a navigation computer with no live response for emergencies, so if you’re involved in an accident and you’re incapacitated help may not come as quickly.

Both the Fusion and the Altima Sedan have standard driver and passenger frontal airbags, front side-impact airbags, side-impact head airbags, front seatbelt pretensioners, front-wheel drive, height-adjustable front shoulder belts, plastic fuel tanks, four-wheel antilock brakes, traction control, electronic stability systems to prevent skidding, available crash mitigating brakes, lane departure warning systems, blind spot warning systems, front and rear parking sensors and rear cross-path warning.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration does 35 MPH front crash tests on new vehicles. In this test, results indicate that the Ford Fusion is safer than the Nissan Altima Sedan:

 

Fusion

Altima Sedan

 

Driver

STARS

5 Stars

5 Stars

HIC

125

262

Neck Stress

200 lbs.

216 lbs.

Neck Compression

24 lbs.

59 lbs.

New test not comparable to pre-2011 test results. More stars = Better. Lower test results = Better.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration does side impact tests on new vehicles. In this test, which crashes the vehicle into a flat barrier at 38.5 MPH and into a post at 20 MPH, results indicate that the Ford Fusion is safer than the Nissan Altima Sedan:

 

Fusion

Altima Sedan

 

Front Seat

STARS

5 Stars

3 Stars

HIC

74

98

Chest Movement

1.3 inches

1.4 inches

Hip Force

277 lbs.

493 lbs.

 

Rear Seat

STARS

5 Stars

5 Stars

HIC

225

233

 

Into Pole

STARS

5 Stars

5 Stars

Max Damage Depth

16 inches

17 inches

Hip Force

597 lbs.

711 lbs.

New test not comparable to pre-2011 test results. More stars = Better. Lower test results = Better.

The Ford Fusion has a better fatality history. The Fusion was involved in fatal accidents at a rate 12% lower per vehicle registered than the Altima Sedan, according to the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety.




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