How does a 2017 Ford Flex compare to its competition in Safety Near Buford, GA?


 
  • Greene Ford Journal
  • Sep 3rd 2017 - 78 days ago
  • Buford, GA
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Compared To Lincoln MKT 2016



Both the Flex and the MKT have standard driver and passenger frontal airbags, front side-impact airbags, side-impact head airbags, front seatbelt pretensioners, front-wheel drive, height-adjustable front shoulder belts, plastic fuel tanks, four-wheel antilock brakes, traction control, electronic stability systems to prevent skidding, rearview cameras, available collision warning systems, blind spot warning systems and rear cross-path warning.




Compared To BMW X5 2017



For enhanced safety, the front seat shoulder belts of the Ford Flex are height-adjustable to accommodate a wide variety of driver and passenger heights. A better fit can prevent injuries and the increased comfort also encourages passengers to buckle up. The BMW X5 doesn’t offer height-adjustable seat belts.

The middle row seatbelts optional on the Flex inflate when a collision is detected, helping to spread crash forces over a much larger area of the body and limiting head and neck movement. This can help prevent spinal and internal injuries. The X5 doesn’t offer inflatable seatbelts.

To help make backing safer, the Flex (except SE)’s optional cross-path warning system uses wide-angle radar in the rear bumper to alert the driver to vehicles approaching from the side, helping the driver avoid collisions. The X5 doesn’t offer a cross-path warning system.

Both the Flex and the X5 have standard driver and passenger frontal airbags, front side-impact airbags, side-impact head airbags, front seatbelt pretensioners, four-wheel antilock brakes, traction control, electronic stability systems to prevent skidding, rear parking sensors, available collision warning systems and blind spot warning systems.




Compared To Nissan Pathfinder 2017



The middle row seatbelts optional on the Flex inflate when a collision is detected, helping to spread crash forces over a much larger area of the body and limiting head and neck movement. This can help prevent spinal and internal injuries. The Pathfinder doesn’t offer inflatable seatbelts.

The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety tests front crash prevention systems. With a score of 1 point, IIHS rates the frontal crash prevention system optional in the Flex as “Basic.” The Pathfinder scores zero, and is rated by the IIHS as having no effective frontal crash prevention.

Both the Flex and the Pathfinder have standard driver and passenger frontal airbags, front side-impact airbags, side-impact head airbags, front seatbelt pretensioners, front-wheel drive, height-adjustable front shoulder belts, plastic fuel tanks, four-wheel antilock brakes, traction control, electronic stability systems to prevent skidding, rearview cameras, available blind spot warning systems and rear cross-path warning.




Compared To Chrysler Town and Country 2016



The middle row seatbelts optional on the Flex inflate when a collision is detected, helping to spread crash forces over a much larger area of the body and limiting head and neck movement. This can help prevent spinal and internal injuries. The Town and Country doesn’t offer inflatable seatbelts.

The Flex Limited offers an optional collision warning system, which detects an impending crash through forward mounted sensors and flashes a bright light and sounds a loud, distinctive tone to warn the driver to brake or maneuver immediately to avoid a collision. The system also pre-charges the brakes to begin deceleration more quickly. The Town and Country doesn\'t offer a collision warning system.

The Flex offers all-wheel drive to maximize traction under poor conditions, especially in ice and snow. The Town and Country doesn’t offer all-wheel drive.

The Flex has standard 911 Assist, which uses a global positioning satellite (GPS) receiver and a cellular system to get turn-by-turn driving directions or send emergency personnel to the scene if any airbags deploy. The Town and Country doesn’t offer a GPS response system, only a navigation computer with no live response for emergencies, so if you’re involved in an accident and you’re incapacitated help may not come as quickly.

Both the Flex and the Town and Country have standard driver and passenger frontal airbags, front side-impact airbags, side-impact head airbags, front seatbelt pretensioners, front-wheel drive, height-adjustable front shoulder belts, plastic fuel tanks, four-wheel antilock brakes, traction control, electronic stability systems to prevent skidding, rearview cameras, available blind spot warning systems and rear cross-path warning.

A significantly tougher test than their original offset frontal crash test, the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety does 40 MPH small overlap frontal offset crash tests. In this test, where only 25% of the total width of the vehicle is struck, results indicate that the Ford Flex is safer than the Town and Country:

 

Flex

Town and Country

Overall Evaluation

ACCEPTABLE

POOR

Restraints

ACCEPTABLE

MARGINAL

Head Neck Evaluation

GOOD

GOOD

Head injury index

49

230

Peak Head Forces

0 G’s

 

Steering Column Movement Rearward

11 cm

17 cm

Chest Evaluation

GOOD

GOOD

Hip & Thigh Evaluation

GOOD

POOR

Femur Force R/L

2.8/2.2 kN

13.4/4 kN

Hip & Thigh Injury Risk R/L

0%/0%

100%/1%

Lower Leg Evaluation

GOOD

POOR

Tibia index R/L

.53/.69

2.29/.9

Tibia forces R/L

.7/.8 kN

3.5/3.4 kN

The Ford Flex has a better fatality history. The Flex was involved in fatal accidents at a rate 20% lower per vehicle registered than the Town and Country, according to the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety.




Compared To Lexus GX460 2017



The middle row seatbelts optional on the Flex inflate when a collision is detected, helping to spread crash forces over a much larger area of the body and limiting head and neck movement. This can help prevent spinal and internal injuries. The GX460 doesn’t offer inflatable seatbelts.

For better protection of the passenger compartment, the Flex uses safety cell construction with a three-dimensional high-strength frame that surrounds the passenger compartment. It provides extra impact protection and a sturdy mounting location for door hardware and side impact beams. The GX460 uses a body-on-frame design, which has no frame members above the floor of the vehicle.

Both the Flex and the GX460 have standard driver and passenger frontal airbags, front side-impact airbags, side-impact head airbags, front seatbelt pretensioners, height-adjustable front shoulder belts, plastic fuel tanks, four-wheel antilock brakes, traction control, electronic stability systems to prevent skidding, rearview cameras, available collision warning systems, blind spot warning systems and rear cross-path warning.




Compared To Toyota 4Runner 2017



The middle row seatbelts optional on the Flex inflate when a collision is detected, helping to spread crash forces over a much larger area of the body and limiting head and neck movement. This can help prevent spinal and internal injuries. The 4Runner doesn’t offer inflatable seatbelts.

The Flex Limited offers an optional collision warning system, which detects an impending crash through forward mounted sensors and flashes a bright light and sounds a loud, distinctive tone to warn the driver to brake or maneuver immediately to avoid a collision. The system also pre-charges the brakes to begin deceleration more quickly. The 4Runner doesn\'t offer a collision warning system.

The Flex (except SE)’s optional blind spot warning system uses digital cameras monitored by computer to alert the driver to moving objects in the vehicle’s blind spots where the side view mirrors don’t reveal them. The 4Runner doesn’t offer a system to reveal objects in the driver’s blind spots.

To help make backing safer, the Flex (except SE)’s optional cross-path warning system uses wide-angle radar in the rear bumper to alert the driver to vehicles approaching from the side, helping the driver avoid collisions. The 4Runner doesn’t offer a cross-path warning system.

For better protection of the passenger compartment, the Flex uses safety cell construction with a three-dimensional high-strength frame that surrounds the passenger compartment. It provides extra impact protection and a sturdy mounting location for door hardware and side impact beams. The 4Runner uses a body-on-frame design, which has no frame members above the floor of the vehicle.

Both the Flex and the 4Runner have standard driver and passenger frontal airbags, front side-impact airbags, side-impact head airbags, front seatbelt pretensioners, height adjustable front shoulder belts, plastic fuel tanks, four-wheel antilock brakes, traction control, electronic stability systems to prevent skidding and rearview cameras.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration does 35 MPH front crash tests on new vehicles. In this test, results indicate that the Ford Flex is safer than the 4Runner:

 

Flex

4Runner

 

Driver

STARS

5 Stars

5 Stars

Head Injury Index

223

415

 

Passenger

STARS

5 Stars

4 Stars

Head Injury Index

326

524

Chest forces

36 g’s

52 g’s

More stars indicate a better overall result. Lower numbers indicate better individual test results. Not comparable with post-2010 results.

A significantly tougher test than their original offset frontal crash test, the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety does 40 MPH small overlap frontal offset crash tests. In this test, where only 25% of the total width of the vehicle is struck, results indicate that the Ford Flex is safer than the 4Runner:

 

Flex

4Runner

Overall Evaluation

ACCEPTABLE

MARGINAL

Head Neck Evaluation

GOOD

GOOD

Head injury index

49

142

Peak Head Forces

0 G’s

0 G’s

Steering Column Movement Rearward

11 cm

12 cm

Chest Evaluation

GOOD

GOOD

Hip & Thigh Evaluation

GOOD

GOOD

Femur Force R/L

2.8/2.2 kN

3.9/2.4 kN

Hip & Thigh Injury Risk R/L

0%/0%

1%/0%

Lower Leg Evaluation

GOOD

ACCEPTABLE

Tibia index R/L

.53/.69

.95/.85

Tibia forces R/L

.7/.8 kN

5/2.9 kN

Instrumented handling tests conducted by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and analysis of its dimensions indicate that the Flex, with its four-star roll-over rating, is 8.2% to 9.5% less likely to roll over than the 4Runner, which received a three-star rating.




Compared To Nissan Quest 2017



The middle row seatbelts optional on the Flex inflate when a collision is detected, helping to spread crash forces over a much larger area of the body and limiting head and neck movement. This can help prevent spinal and internal injuries. The Quest doesn’t offer inflatable seatbelts.

The Flex Limited offers an optional collision warning system, which detects an impending crash through forward mounted sensors and flashes a bright light and sounds a loud, distinctive tone to warn the driver to brake or maneuver immediately to avoid a collision. The system also pre-charges the brakes to begin deceleration more quickly. The Quest doesn\'t offer a collision warning system.

The Flex offers all-wheel drive to maximize traction under poor conditions, especially in ice and snow. The Quest doesn’t offer all-wheel drive.

To help make backing safer, the Flex (except SE)’s optional cross-path warning system uses wide-angle radar in the rear bumper to alert the driver to vehicles approaching from the side, helping the driver avoid collisions. The Quest doesn’t offer a cross-path warning system.

The Flex has standard 911 Assist, which uses a global positioning satellite (GPS) receiver and a cellular system to get turn-by-turn driving directions or send emergency personnel to the scene if any airbags deploy. The Quest doesn’t offer a GPS response system, only a navigation computer with no live response for emergencies, so if you’re involved in an accident and you’re incapacitated help may not come as quickly.

Both the Flex and the Quest have standard driver and passenger frontal airbags, front side-impact airbags, side-impact head airbags, front seatbelt pretensioners, front wheel drive, height adjustable front shoulder belts, plastic fuel tanks, four-wheel antilock brakes, traction control, electronic stability systems to prevent skidding and available blind spot warning systems.

A significantly tougher test than their original offset frontal crash test, the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety does 40 MPH small overlap frontal offset crash tests. In this test, where only 25% of the total width of the vehicle is struck, results indicate that the Ford Flex is safer than the Quest:

 

Flex

Quest

Overall Evaluation

ACCEPTABLE

POOR

Head Neck Evaluation

GOOD

GOOD

Head injury index

49

527

Peak Head Forces

0 G’s

0 G’s

Steering Column Movement Rearward

11 cm

21 cm

Chest Evaluation

GOOD

GOOD

Hip & Thigh Evaluation

GOOD

POOR

Femur Force R/L

2.8/2.2 kN

12.3/5.9 kN

Hip & Thigh Injury Risk R/L

0%/0%

63%/6%

Lower Leg Evaluation

GOOD

POOR

Tibia index R/L

.53/.69

2.29/.63

Tibia forces R/L

.7/.8 kN

1.8/1.3 kN

The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) performs roof strength tests. In that test the Flex earned the top rating of “Good” because its roof supported over four times the Flex’s weight before being crushed five inches. The Quest was rated lower at “Acceptable.”




Compared To Toyota Sienna 2017



The middle row seatbelts optional on the Flex inflate when a collision is detected, helping to spread crash forces over a much larger area of the body and limiting head and neck movement. This can help prevent spinal and internal injuries. The Sienna doesn’t offer inflatable seatbelts.

Both the Flex and the Sienna have standard driver and passenger frontal airbags, front side-impact airbags, side-impact head airbags, front seatbelt pretensioners, front-wheel drive, height-adjustable front shoulder belts, plastic fuel tanks, four-wheel antilock brakes, traction control, electronic stability systems to prevent skidding, rearview cameras, available collision warning systems, blind spot warning systems and rear cross-path warning.

The Ford Flex has a better fatality history. The Flex was involved in fatal accidents at a rate 22% lower per vehicle registered than the Sienna, according to the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety.




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